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Monday, 03 May 2021 00:00

While high heels are commonly worn by many women, they can have long term effects on the feet. High heel wearers can walk with shorter and more forceful strides, and their toes are usually in a flexed position. This can put more strain on the muscles since the calf muscles have shortened. Additionally, once a regular high heel wearer goes back to more comfortable shoes like sneakers or flip flops, they are at a greater risk of developing an injury because they are putting their injured feet into a new environment. Ultimately, wearing high heels on a daily basis can lead to issues such as hammertoes, bunions, sprained ankles, fractures and ligament tears. If you are suffering from injuries due to wearing high heels, or you would like tips on how to prevent injuries while wearing high heels, consulting with a podiatrist is recommended. A podiatrist will be able to treat your foot and ankle problems and offer advice on how to prevent future injuries.

High heels have a history of causing foot and ankle problems. If you have any concerns about your feet or ankles, contact Matthew G. Ollerton, DPM from Foot & Ankle Clinics of Utah. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Effects of High Heels on the Feet

High heels are popular shoes among women because of their many styles and societal appeal.  Despite this, high heels can still cause many health problems if worn too frequently.

Which Parts of My Body Will Be Affected by High Heels?

  • Ankle Joints
  • Achilles Tendon – May shorten and stiffen with prolonged wear
  • Balls of the Feet
  • Knees – Heels cause the knees to bend constantly, creating stress on them
  • Back – They decrease the spine’s ability to absorb shock, which may lead to back pain.  The vertebrae of the lower back may compress.

What Kinds of Foot Problems Can Develop from Wearing High Heels?

  • Corns
  • Calluses
  • Hammertoe
  • Bunions
  • Morton’s Neuroma
  • Plantar Fasciitis

How Can I Still Wear High Heels and Maintain Foot Health?

If you want to wear high heeled shoes, make sure that you are not wearing them every day, as this will help prevent long term physical problems.  Try wearing thicker heels as opposed to stilettos to distribute weight more evenly across the feet.  Always make sure you are wearing the proper shoes for the right occasion, such as sneakers for exercising.  If you walk to work, try carrying your heels with you and changing into them once you arrive at work.  Adding inserts to your heels can help cushion your feet and absorb shock. Full foot inserts or metatarsal pads are available. 

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Springville, UT . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Monday, 26 April 2021 00:00

Foot wounds are open cuts or sores that form on the feet. There are several different types of foot wounds. Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) occur due to diabetes or diabetic neuropathy. They can appear anywhere on the foot, but often appear on the big toes, balls of the feet, and the heels. These wounds typically heal slowly and poorly. Venous stasis ulcers appear on the ankles or legs due to vein damage. Arterial ulcers are caused by arterial insufficiency or poor circulation, and usually occur between or on the tips of the toes and along the outer ankles. A pressure ulcer is caused by foot immobility or by wearing improper shoes. They are usually seen on the heels or ankles. If you have any wounds on your feet, it is strongly suggested that you seek the care of a podiatrist.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Matthew G. Ollerton, DPM from Foot & Ankle Clinics of Utah. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Springville, UT . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Monday, 19 April 2021 00:00

Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) is a restriction of blood flow to the muscles and organs due to the build-up of plaque on artery walls. PAD starves muscles and organs of the oxygen and nutrients they need to function properly—especially during physical activities. This lack of oxygen-rich blood to the extremities can make it difficult to walk and can also cause pain in the feet and legs. This pain from PAD can go undetected in people who also suffer from diabetes and neuropathy, possibly leading to foot sores which—when caused by severe blood flow reduction—can increase the risk of amputation. Individuals who are afflicted with PAD and/or diabetes should be under the care of a podiatrist who can help to manage these conditions and improve overall health.

Peripheral artery disease can pose a serious risk to your health. It can increase the risk of stroke and heart attack. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, consult with Matthew G. Ollerton, DPM from Foot & Ankle Clinics of Utah. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is when arteries are constricted due to plaque (fatty deposits) build-up. This results in less blood flow to the legs and other extremities. The main cause of PAD is atherosclerosis, in which plaque builds up in the arteries.

Symptoms

Symptoms of PAD include:

  • Claudication (leg pain from walking)
  • Numbness in legs
  • Decrease in growth of leg hair and toenails
  • Paleness of the skin
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Sores and wounds on legs and feet that won’t heal
  • Coldness in one leg

It is important to note that a majority of individuals never show any symptoms of PAD.

Diagnosis

While PAD occurs in the legs and arteries, Podiatrists can diagnose PAD. Podiatrists utilize a test called an ankle-brachial index (ABI). An ABI test compares blood pressure in your arm to you ankle to see if any abnormality occurs. Ultrasound and imaging devices may also be used.

Treatment

Fortunately, lifestyle changes such as maintaining a healthy diet, exercising, managing cholesterol and blood sugar levels, and quitting smoking, can all treat PAD. Medications that prevent clots from occurring can be prescribed. Finally, in some cases, surgery may be recommended.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Springville, UT . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Friday, 16 April 2021 00:00

Do you suffer from heel pain when you get up in the morning? If so, you should seek the professional help of your podiatrist and have a proper diagnosis performed. Heel pain can be caused by several different foot-related conditions.

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